Preserving Your Land

Donating Property

It’s great that you are considering donating property to the Heritage Land Preservation Trust. While everybody’s situation is different, here are some simple guidelines to help you get started.

The party donating the property is called the Grantor and the party accepting the property (Heritage) is called the Grantee.

Many Grantors have generously made a monetary donation to the Trust to help defray the costs of maintenance, insurance, etc. to be incurred in the future.

Grantors Should Know

  • Heritage has to vote on whether to accept the offer.
  • The Grantor should seek the guidance of a trusted legal or financial expert. In many cases, there can be an income tax benefit in favor of the Grantor. If so, it is the responsibility of the Grantor to ascertain the value of the property being offered.
  • All property taxes must be paid and be up to date, the Land Trust will not accept property unless all property taxes have been paid.
  • An A-2 survey should be provided to Heritage.
  • The Grantor may file an IRS form 8283, informing the IRS of the value of the donation. Heritage needs to co-sign this form.
  • A deed conveying the property will be drawn by the Grantor’s attorney and filed with the Town/City Clerk’s office by the attorney for Heritage.

Responsibilities of the Grantee

  • Prior to acceptance, a physical inspection of the property will be conducted by Heritage, and a title search will be conducted by their attorney. A vote on accepting the property will be conducted by their Trustees.
  • After the deed is filed, a CT Form M-4 must be filed by Heritage with the local Assessor’s Office, to inform them that the property will be coming off the tax rolls.
  • The Grantor may file an IRS form 8283, which informs the IRS of the value of the donation. Heritage needs to co-sign this form.

Consider the Deed Language

One thing to consider is the language in the deed. Many grantors have placed restrictions, such as stipulating that the land will remain in its natural state, buildings will be prohibited, the land will be used solely for educational purposes, etc. The grantor should also consider how the property should be called, for instance, in memory of a loved one.

Scroll to Top